Sunday, August 31, 2008

Dubai at 6:10 am

I'm here after a relatively easy 9 hours.
It was 38 degrees celsius when I walked out of the airport at 4:45 this morning.
Its going to be a hot one today.
Its Ramada which means no food, drink or even smoking during daylight hours.
That's a little different than the full on smells and frenetic pace of HK
As you can see the prohibition on intake has no bearing on the required output of the swarming sea of Bangladeshis who build this city 24 hours a day. It is what it is.
I managed to scoff a club sandwhich before a shower and heading out the door.
Be good.
T

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

----post at your discretion or edit as you please ---
I say just sign a lease for the first 350sqft/ $3000 apt you see. you can kit it out the way this woman did in this recent NYtimes article http://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/31/realestate/31habi.html?_r=1&ref=realestate&oref=slogin

you'll need to hire a maid and a feng shui expert. :)

I hope you're heading home soon. you must be missing Jess an awful lot.

I hope I can talk to you before I leave for DRC. I don't know if you have the same or a new phone number.

Take care,
Tatia

Terry said...

Hey
Democratic Republic of Congo????
Good god woman BE CAREFUL. I have no phone at the moment, nor do I have any phone numbers!!!!!
I am "at sea" in that regard.
I'm hoping that Outlook on the sever at work has saved all my contact info as its all blank on my laptop......
T

Anonymous said...

Ahhh, so when I wrote that I was going to Congo several posts ago did you think i was talking about Brazzaville or what? (that was meant to be snarky).

I do, however, really have to figure out the travel logistics because the whole point of the trip is to visit a couple of locations in the interior. The last time I went, I flew a Congolese commercial airline from Kinshasa to Goma. Then the same airline had a flight crash about a month later. And just today it was reported that a flight run by the supposedly "safe" UN-operated travel option (Airserv), used by many humanitarian workers, just crashed. 15 people died. Many worked for UNDP.

It's really, really sad...

...and then I remember one of my friends just shipped out to Iraq for a year (US foreign service officer) and another to Afghanistan (UN elections specialists). Of course these aren't "front-line" jobs by any stretch. Neither is being a UNDP good governance officer. But there are very obvious and real risks to working in these venues.

...and there are also real risks every time I cross the street or get on a plane to see my mom in Chicago.

-Tatia

Suzanne Portnoy said...

I've stopped understanding why you do what you do. At first it seemed quite exciting but now it just feels like you're on the world's longest treadmill. How do you do it?

Terry said...

I've been doing it for so long that it seems natural and life behind a desk has no appeal......

Terry said...
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